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Rekkemmo

Slow Speeds Issues

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Rekkemmo

Hi guys, 

So I've been seeing a lot of people getting kicked for slow speeds issues recently. This is often caused by two issues:

1, You genuinely have slow sync speeds (the speed that gets to your router)

2, You have slow speeds via a throughput issue to your device, for example poor wifi

 

Regarding Slow Sync Speeds this is a very difficult process to explain depending on the country you live in and the network available to you. In the UK with providers on an Openreach network providers advise that you follow some simple checks:

1, Estimated Speeds: Estimated speeds will be best provided by your provider in your contract, although alternatives exist that can give you a better grasp of whats going on. For example: Kitz.co.uk is good for rough estimate but may be a bit technical for some

2, Goto speedtest.net and test your speeds (Please note this should be done via a hardwired connection with no other app running or devices connected), these should be taken once in the morning, once in the afternoon and once in the evening. This will allow us to test if based on the below checks your speeds have improved. 

3, Change the ADSL/VDSL Microfilter: This is a small white matchbox shaped adapter that plugs into your phone socket and works as a sort of splitter for your homephone and broadband. I would advise changing these every 12 - 18 months. [If you have a phone socket with two slots, unless you do the below test you don't need a filter]

4, Try accessing the Test Socket. Most phone sockets from Openreach will have a horizontal split that runs all the way across the phone socket, separating the top and bottom of the socket, if you have one of these the bottom half can be removed. Older phone sockets may have screws, new ones (Like the NTE5C socket) can simply be taken off by pinching either side of the bottom panel and then pulling. Inside is a secondary phone socket called the test socket. I'd recommend setting it up: Router -> DSL Cable -> Filter -> Test Socket. [note this must be the socket were the physical line comes in to the house, I don't recommend extensions for broadband]

5, Once you have done the above checks go back to Speedtest.net: Repeat the speedtest to the same site, morning, afternoon and evening and compare the speed test results. If you are getting less than the minimum that your provider promised you I'd advise contacting them and asking they escalate for an engineer. 

6, Ping and Traceroute testsSometimes providers will struggle to find the source of slow speeds faults and may ask that you perform ping and traceroute tests. These can be difficult for some people to do but are actually quite easy to do. So for different operating systems there are different way to do this:

MAC OS X: Goto applications and click terminal, ping and traceroute can be seen here. Run the commands to google.co.uk and copy the results into a txt file, your provider will need these.

Windows 7/8/8.1/10: Open your applications folder and run CMD. Once CMD is open run "ping www.google.co.uk" 3 times and then run "tracert www.google.co.uk" 3 times. Copy these to a notepad doc because your provider may need these. 

 

Poor wifi is a bit different. If you have run the speed tests via a wired connection and find your speeds are actually really good and its just the wifi that's slow or keeps dropping out. I'd recommend using ethernet were possible, especially when gaming. If that is not possible here are  a few things you can try. 

1, Change your wifi channel. So basically routers broadcast on a number of frequencies. So first let's breakdown what you may have. You will most likely have a 2.4 Ghz Network on your router so lets make some suggestions if this is all you have. 

1.1, If you have 2.4 Ghz and that is what you are using if you can't use ethernet then I'd recommend trying to change the channel. The method varies from router to router but basically you goto your browser and type the routers address in (IE 192.168.0.1) and then what you do is sign in with the username and password (this is often on the router itself, it might ask you to change the password though) and then goto wifi settings. Once there change the wifi channel to anything else (I'd recommend staying away from channel 1). Also please note some providers can do this for you remotely if you ring them.

2, If you have a 5 Ghz network then basically this network is essentially capable of delivering faster speeds over wifi but channels can still be an issue so I'd recommend changing this. 

3, The problem with 2.4 Ghz and 5 Ghz networks is as follows:

2.4 Ghz: Is really good for obstructions but is slower and more prone to interference, people who live in apartments often find this network to be near unbearable.

5 Ghz: is really good if obstructions are none existent or very thin. If you have thin walls or have line of sight to the router, then this will be the best network for you. If you live an a old victorian house with thick brick walls, this network will likely not be very good for you. Please note not all devices can use 5 Ghz networks IE the PS4 cannot connect to this network.

6, Another thing you can try if ethernet is not an option and you can't change the channels, baring in mind if you can't get into your router to change it, your provider MIGHT be able to do it remotely, not all providers can. Then I'd suggest trying power line adapters. I use these myself and I live in a 3 story house. Essentially you have two power line adapters. One plugs into the socket near the router, and another near your computer. You attach an ethernet cable to the router from one adapter, and the adapter near your computer also has an ethernet cable attached, you sync up the adapters via the manufactures instructions and there you go, ethernet connection over a long distance without the wired mayhem in a large house. Please bare in mind depending on the power lines in your house your speeds will vary through these. To put mine into perspective I get 250 Mbp/s to my router and I get that through direct ethernet. However through my powerline adapters I only get 80 Mbp/s, which in my opinion is very usable for most gamers. 

 

I hope the above helps some of you out, feel free to ask any questions. 

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CMO Norman

Awesome information 🙂

Using custom DNSs is also worth a mention - if not for speed but for security, 

I personally use Cloudflare on https://1.1.1.1 as does Ciaran but for some people there’s less hops when tracerouting google on https://8.8.8.8

Ive definitely seen a difference since switching from my ISPs DNS

More

 

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Simon Ross
Posted (edited)

https://www.currys.co.uk/gbuk/computing-accessories/networking/powerline/bt-broadband-extender-flex-600-powerline-adapter-kit-twin-pack-10142651-pdt.html

 

I use something similar to this to allow me to have ethernet access on my laptop even though my router is downstairs. It works by using the mains electricicty although it isn’t as good as a cat6 cable into the router, it is still much stronger than Wi-fi, and I haven’t had many issues with it at all.

 

Edited by Simon Ross

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Rekkemmo
On 27/08/2018 at 01:37, CMO Norman said:

Awesome information 🙂

Using custom DNSs is also worth a mention - if not for speed but for security, 

I personally use Cloudflare on https://1.1.1.1 as does Ciaran but for some people there’s less hops when tracerouting google on https://8.8.8.8

Ive definitely seen a difference since switching from my ISPs DNS

More

 

I've tried to keep it simple. That's the standard process needed above for slow speeds issues with providers on the Openreach network.

On 27/08/2018 at 08:18, Simon Ross said:

https://www.currys.co.uk/gbuk/computing-accessories/networking/powerline/bt-broadband-extender-flex-600-powerline-adapter-kit-twin-pack-10142651-pdt.html

 

I use something similar to this to allow me to have ethernet access on my laptop even though my router is downstairs. It works by using the mains electricicty although it isn’t as good as a cat6 cable into the router, it is still much stronger than Wi-fi, and I haven’t had many issues with it at all.

 

Yea I mentioned that in yellow paragraph 6. They are decent. I use them. I have one main adapter with 2 adapters synced to it because I live in a 3 story house.

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